A Bird, came down the walk

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson

The American poet Emily Dickinson and her contemporary Walt Whitman are regarded as the founders of a unique American poetic voice.

As the former lived in seclusion, only ten of her nearly 1800 poems are known to have been published in her lifetime. Her poems are unique for the era in which she wrote because she freely ignored the usual rules of versification. Her work’s main themes are death and immortality.

A Bird, came down the Walk -
He did not know I saw -
He bit an Angle Worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw,

And then, he drank a Dew
From a convenient Grass -
And then hopped sidewise to the Wall
To let a Beetle pass -

He glanced with rapid eyes,
That hurried all abroad -
They looked like frightened Beads, I thought,
He stirred his Velvet Head. -

Like one in danger, Cautious,
I offered him a Crumb,
And he unrolled his feathers,
And rowed him softer Home -

Than Oars divide the Ocean,
Too silver for a seam,
Or Butterflies, off Banks of Noon,
Leap, plashless as they swim.